en Select a Language

The Impact of a Criminal Conviction on your Immigration Process

criminal conviction

The Impact of a Criminal Conviction on your Immigration Process The process of becoming a U.S. citizen takes patience, time, and persistence. But what if you get a criminal conviction in the middle or before starting the process?


There are a list of crimes that immediately void your application. You can find them here on the USCIS website. Others can truly complicate your citizenship path. Keep reading to learn how.

The Immigration and Nationality Act, also known as INA, offers a great guide on what you can and cannot do when in the process of becoming a citizen. 


Did you commit a crime that is Moral Turpitude? 

A crime is considered moral turpitude under the INA when it is contrary to the rules of morality or depraved, baseless and/or vile. This type of crime category can nullify your process. Since a moral turpitude does not exist as an official charge, but indeed to the nature of the crime, some examples would include: 

Fraud 

Child 

Abuse 

Kidnapping 

Theft 

Murder or manslaughter 

Partner abuse. 


Were you involved in any trafficking? 

If you were involved with any type of trafficking, whether drug and/or human, the government won’t even allow you to entry the country. If you are not a citizen, but need to face charges while in the United States, you may be deported. 


You May Apply for a Waiver 

There are certain cases in which the INA will allow you to apply for a waiver for certain criminal records. Such as for example, prostitution convictions, even more so when you are young and possibly part of a trafficking ring. Another example is time of conviction that could determine your eligibility for a waiver. 


The U.S. Citizenship process is a long route! If you need help during the process, alway contact a trusted immigration lawyer to help you with your case.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.